Wandering Will-o’-the-wisps and their ways

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While these small glowing orbs of light, have been a part of mythology and in many fantasy stories—people have claimed to have seen them in different locations throughout the world. They are known as Will-o’-the-wisp.

These small sized atmospheric ghost-like lights, have been seen especially at night over terrains like swamps, bogs and marshes in particular. Comparable to a flickering lantern lamp light, these glow immensely.

Image: whimsyroots.com Little girl and Will o the wisp

Image: whimsyroots.com Little girl and Will o the wisp

It has been said that Will-o’-the-wisp have helped travelers find their way back home or back to a pathway, simply by following them as they float through the air. They are also known by other names which include jack-o’-lantern, friar’s lantern, hinkypunk, and hobby lantern in English.

Reports of them fading away when approached, are quite common occurrence. However, some Will-o’-the-wisp will keep their form, if they choose to. Believed to be a living thing, they wander the world in times of despair and sadness, in attempts to lighten up the world in some way. In the United States, often they are referred to as “spook-lights,” “ghost-lights,” or “orbs” by folklorists and paranormal enthusiasts alike.

Image: Will o wisps by Emerald Depths

Image: Will o wisps by Emerald Depths

The scientific explanation regarding Will-o’-the-Wisps is, that they are merely caused by burning gases—known as “swamp gas” or “marsh gas”. This develops from the breakdown of organic matter, in persistently wet areas. How wisps move, is best explained by being them gaseous. Meanwhile, when approached, they disperse from the movements in the air.

That being said, many swear they have encountered these small luminescent balls of light, even seeing humanoid type details within them. Others believe, that the Will-o’-the-Wisps are in fact not good but bad instead.

In South America, people think that these are witches—who transformed themselves into these glowing balls of light. One other explanation is, the Will-o’-the-Wisps are lights indicating where gold or hidden treasure may be found. Only children, can assist the wisps with finding the treasure.

Image: whimsyroots.com Quinn and the Will o the Wisp

Image: whimsyroots.com Quinn and the Will o the Wisp

Within the swampy terrains of Massachusetts, is a place known as the Bridgewater Triangle. Here at the Triangle, are plenty of paranormal stories ranging from Bigfoot sightings, UFOs, balls of fire, giant snakes and more.

Will-o’-the-Wisps and other orbs, have been spotted there as well. Further legends and lore mentions, that in Britain and in Ireland Will-o’-the-Wisps were the spirits of the dead, who lured travelers into dangerous treacherous territories, hoping to bring them an early demise. These wisps, were escientally the spirits of the dead, unable to enter neither heaven or hell.

Their demeanor’s ranged from simply mischievous to malevolent, quite often taking pleasure in leading people astray and into dangerous situations. Interestingly enough, Will-o’-the-Wisps spotted within a cemetery meant certain death for the individual who gazed upon them.

Argentinians believe the Luz Mala (evil light) is fearsome. When the Will-o’-the-Wisp are seen white colored, it represents a troubled soul needing to say a prayer. If however the light is red, then the devil (Satan) itself is tempting the person, by bringing them into hell. The person would be wise to wander away rather quickly. No doubt, these incredible entities holding meaning to many both good and bad. The next time your out in the wilderness, there might be a Will-o’-the-Wisp waiting for you.

(Source: Wikipedia and Today I Found Out)

Terry Larch

Began his blogging career writing about movies. After further study about different paranormal encounters, he decided spend more time researching about them. Along the way, he has met many people from all walks of life. His open minded theories about various topics give him a different perspective in his writings.

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